Abu Ghraib, Gen. Myers and those Wacky Troops

Tuesday, August 16, 2005

The Pentagon opposes the release of 87 photos and 4 videotapes ordered for released under the Freedom of Information Act filed by the ACLU. The photos in question come from the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq. I believe we all remember the first set of photos to come out of there. So, why have they not been released yet?

General Richard Myers, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, has an answer for that. He believes if the tapes and photos are made public they could incite riots and violence. Wait, that isn't the only reason the world cannot see what we are doing to the people of Iraq. Gen. Myers also had this to say: "It is probable that Al Qaeda and other groups will seize upon these images and videos as grist for their propaganda mill, which will result in, besides violent attacks, increased terrorist recruitment, continued financial support and exacerbation of tensions between Iraqi and Afghani populaces and U.S. and coalition forces."

Stop, let's try to sort this out here. The administration is afraid that if Al Qaeda and other groups get a hold of the photos and videos that show the mighty democratic America torturing (reportedly raping) innocent people, then they might use it as propaganda? Whose propaganda mill do you think is larger? Ours or theirs? I think we may have just had a breakthrough. The images that are on the tapes and photos are the reason these groups hate us and our blatant hypocrisy. So our illegal invasion and occupation of a country did not help terrorist recruitment, but videos and photos of what our "boys" are doing in Iraq will? The truth will?

Who knows exactly what is on these tapes and photos, but judging by the lengths to which the Pentagon is going to keep them from the public would suggest they are much worse than the previously released photos. Gen. Myers had this to say of the tapes and photos: "I condemn in the strongest terms the misconduct and abuse depicted in these images. It was illegal, immoral and contrary to American values and character." I would disagree, I bet what is in the photos and tapes is exactly in line with current administration's values and character.

Certainly, the most pathetic and feeble excuse for not releasing these tapes and photos was when Gen. Myers stated that the release of these materials could instigate violence similar to what happened in May after Newsweek published a story of Koran abuse. The pathetic part of that excuse is that Gen. Myers is clearly grasping at straws. It was he who told reporters in May: "It is the judgment of our commander in Afghanistan, General Eichenberry, that in fact the violence that we saw in Jalalabad was not necessarily the result of the allegations about disrespect for the Koran, but more tied up in the political process and the reconciliation process that President Karzai and his cabinet are conducting in Afghanistan. He thought it was not at all tied to the article in the magazine." There is that propaganda mill churning again. Only in America could the government not release things the court ordered them to and use the excuse of "security" as reasoning.

2 comments:

jj said...

I am a little conflicted about this. If what has been reported about some of the tapes is true (The rape of teen boys and women) It may very well cause problems for our troops.

I know we need to have the whole truth but what they are holding back is so much worse than anything we have seen before.

Although I would like to see Rush explain that "it just like college hazing". Well maybe for him it is.

I am torn on this however the truth should prevail always. You are right.

jmcmaster said...

It is a bit tough, I don't want troops harmed. That being said if the stuff is true then maybe they deserve to be? Either way not exposing the truth because it is horrible is no way to govern. Maybe we should just not torture, rape and murder people how about that. The world and the American public deserve to know what is going on over there to HUMAN BEINGS.

 
 
 
 
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